New zero-interest loans made available for private EV buyers under new ACT scheme

By July 16, 2021 Electric Vehicles

NSW green financier Brighte has been chosen for the first phase of the ACT Government’s flagship $150 million Sustainable Household Scheme, with loans set to become available for electric vehicles and chargers.

The program is the first of its kind in Australia and will provide zero-interest loans of between $2,000 to $15,000 for a range of energy upgrades including electric vehicles (EVs), EV chargers, electric heating/cooling, hot water pumps, electric stove tops, solar and batteries.

Brighte plans to offer loans for EVs nationally over the next year making them more widely available as it moves into clean vehicle finance.

“The growth of electric vehicles is both an inevitability and opportunity Brighte can help households take advantage of,” said Brighte Founder and CEO Katherine McConnell.

“Brighte is perfectly positioned to offer EV finance to complement our range of sustainable finance offerings. EVs aren’t just going to play role on our roads – but also in driving smart sustainable homes.”

The appointment of Brighte by the ACT Government will cover the first 12 months of the Scheme’s operations, with the government having the option for a further 12-month extension.

“We’ve already helped tens of thousands of Australian families experience the benefits of sustainable household energy, cutting their bills and lowering emissions – and now we want to take this to a new level in the ACT,” said McConnell.

“Brighte is on a mission to make every home sustainable, so there is a strong and natural alignment between our purpose and the Scheme’s objectives.”

For organisations with large grey fleets (ie – privately owned vehicles used for business travel) the scheme could represent significant long-term value for your employees that are looking to start their own personal journey towards a zero-emissions future.

No doubt other states will continue to watch the ACT Government’s environmental movements closely to help determine how their own zero-emissions solutions might look in the future.